Popular social media sites ‘harm young people’s mental health’

Poll of 14- to 24-year-olds shows Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat and Twitter increased feelings of inadequacy and anxiety

Four of the five most popular forms of social media harm young peoples mental health, with Instagram the most damaging, according to research by two health organisations.

Instagram has the most negative impact on young peoples mental wellbeing, a survey of almost 1,500 14- to 24-year-olds found, and the health groups accused it of deepening young peoples feelings of inadequacy and anxiety.

The survey, published on Friday, concluded that Snapchat, Facebook and Twitter are also harmful. Among the five only YouTube was judged to have a positive impact.

The four platforms have a negative effect because they can exacerbate childrens and young peoples body image worries, and worsen bullying, sleep problems and feelings of anxiety, depression and loneliness, the participants said.

The findings follow growing concern among politicians, health bodies, doctors, charities and parents about young people suffering harm as a result of sexting, cyberbullying and social media reinforcing feelings of self-loathing and even the risk of them committing suicide.

Its interesting to see Instagram and Snapchat ranking as the worst for mental health and wellbeing. Both platforms are very image-focused and it appears that they may be driving feelings of inadequacy and anxiety in young people, said Shirley Cramer, chief executive of the Royal Society for Public Health, which undertook the survey with the Young Health Movement.

She demanded tough measures to make social media less of a wild west when it comes to young peoples mental health and wellbeing. Social media firms should bring in a pop-up image to warn young people that they have been using it a lot, while Instagram and similar platforms should alert users when photographs of people have been digitally manipulated, Cramer said.

The 1,479 young people surveyed were asked to rate the impact of the five forms of social media on 14 different criteria of health and wellbeing, including their effect on sleep, anxiety, depression, loneliness, self-identity, bullying, body image and the fear of missing out.

Instagram emerged with the most negative score. It rated badly for seven of the 14 measures, particularly its impact on sleep, body image and fear of missing out and also for bullying and feelings of anxiety, depression and loneliness. However, young people cited its upsides too, including self-expression, self-identity and emotional support.

YouTube scored very badly for its impact on sleep but positively in nine of the 14 categories, notably awareness and understanding of other peoples health experience, self-expression, loneliness, depression and emotional support.

However, the leader of the UKs psychiatrists said the findings were too simplistic and unfairly blamed social media for the complex reasons why the mental health of so many young people is suffering.

Prof Sir Simon Wessely, president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, said: I am sure that social media plays a role in unhappiness, but it has as many benefits as it does negatives.. We need to teach children how to cope with all aspects of social media good and bad to prepare them for an increasingly digitised world. There is real danger in blaming the medium for the message.

Young Minds, the charity which Theresa May visited last week on a campaign stop, backed the call for Instagram and other platforms to take further steps to protect young users.

Tom Madders, its director of campaigns and communications, said: Prompting young people about heavy usage and signposting to support they may need, on a platform that they identify with, could help many young people.

However, he also urged caution in how content accessed by young people on social media is perceived. Its also important to recognise that simply protecting young people from particular content types can never be the whole solution. We need to support young people so they understand the risks of how they behave online, and are empowered to make sense of and know how to respond to harmful content that slips through filters.

Parents and mental health experts fear that platforms such as Instagram can make young users feel worried and inadequate by facilitating hostile comments about their appearance or reminding them that they have not been invited to, for example, a party many of their peers are attending.

May, who has made childrens mental health one of her priorities, highlighted social medias damaging effects in her shared society speech in January, saying: We know that the use of social media brings additional concerns and challenges. In 2014, just over one in 10 young people said that they had experienced cyberbullying by phone or over the internet.

In February, Jeremy Hunt, the health secretary, warned social media and technology firms that they could face sanctions, including through legislation, unless they did more to tackle sexting, cyberbullying and the trolling of young users.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/may/19/popular-social-media-sites-harm-young-peoples-mental-health

Gluten-free diet carries increased obesity risk, warn experts

Food adapted for those with coeliac disease often has more fat and less protein, and no benefits to non-sufferers, finds research

Substituting everyday staples with gluten-free foods could increase the risk of obesity, experts have warned, after finding that such products often contain higher levels of fats than the food they aim to replace.

A gluten-free diet is essential to those with coeliac disease an auto-immune condition that is thought to affect 1% of Europeans while the regime is also proving increasingly popular among those without the disease. But while a host of gluten-free products are on the market, researchers have said they have a very different nutritional make-up to conventional staples.

There is very little [consumers] can do about it, said Joaquim Calvo Lerma of the Instituto de Investigacin Sanitaria La Fe in Spain and co-author of the research. Unfortunately consumers can [only] eat what is available on the market.

Calvo Lermas warning comes after he and his and colleagues compared 655 conventional food products to 654 gluten-free alternatives across 14 food groups including breads, pasta, breakfast cereals, biscuits and even ready meals, covering a range of brands.

The results presented at the annual meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition reveal that, overall, gluten-free products were more energy-dense than their conventional counterparts.

The team found that, on average, gluten-free bread loaves had more than twice the fat of conventional loaves, while gluten-free breads in general had two to three times less protein than conventional products. Gluten-free biscuits were also found to be lower in protein but higher in fat, while gluten-free pasta had lower levels of sugar and just half of the protein of standard pasta.

Calvo Lerma warned that gluten-free foods could be contributing to an increased risk of obesity, particularly among children who are more likely to eat products like biscuits and breakfast cereals. He urged consumers to compare gluten-free products across brands to find those with the lowest fat content.

Calvo Lerma also called on manufacturers to innovate. It is the responsibility of the food industry to produce these type of gluten-free products from other materials that are much healthier or have a [more] enhanced nutritional profile than the current raw materials being used, like cornflour or potato starch, he said, pointing out that healthier products could be made, for example, using grains such as buckwheat or amaranth.

He added that manufacturers should also add more complete and clearer labels to products to highlight their nutritional content, including levels of vitamins and minerals.

Benjamin Lebwohl, from the coeliac disease centre at Columbia University, who was not involved in the research, said that the study backs up previous evidence that gluten-free foods are nutritionally suboptimal. But while a gluten-free diet is essential for coeliacs, it is not intrinsically healthy or unhealthy, he added. It depends on the choices you make as part of the gluten-free diet, he said.

Sarah Sleet, chief executive of Coeliac UK, said the latest findings tie in with the charitys own research, adding that further development of lower-fat, gluten-free products would be welcomed.

David Sanders, professor of gastroenterology at the University of Sheffield, noted that other studies have found gluten-free and conventional foods to have similar nutritional value. The jury is out, he said.

But Sanders cautioned that there is no evidence a gluten-free diet has benefits for those without gluten sensitivity or coeliac disease. Once you go into the territory of dietary restrictions without medical symptoms then you are running the gauntlet of missing out on various vitamins or minerals without realising it, he said.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/may/11/gluten-free-diet-carries-increased-obesity-risk-warn-experts

Eating cheese does not raise risk of heart attack or stroke, study finds

Consumption of even full-fat dairy products does not increase risk, international team of experts says

Consuming cheese, milk and yoghurt even full-fat versions does not increase the risk of a heart attack or stroke, according to research that challenges the widely held belief that dairy products can damage health.

The findings, from an international team of experts, contradict the view that dairy products can be harmful because of their high saturated fat content. The experts dismiss that fear as a misconception [and] mistaken belief.

The results come from a new meta-analysis of 29 previous studies of whether dairy products increase the risk of death from any cause and from either serious heart problems or cardiovascular disease. The study concluded that such foodstuffs did not raise the risk of any of those events and had a neutral impact on human health.

This meta-analysis showed there were no associations between total dairy, high- and low-fat dairy, milk and the health outcomes including all-cause mortality, coronary heart disease or cardiovascular disease, says the report, published in the European Journal of Epidemiology.

Ian Givens, a professor of food chain nutrition at Reading University, who was one of the researchers, said: Theres quite a widespread but mistaken belief among the public that dairy products in general can be bad for you, but thats a misconception. While it is a widely held belief, our research shows that thats wrong.

Theres been a lot of publicity over the last five to 10 years about how saturated fats increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and a belief has grown up that they must increase the risk, but they dont.

However, the governments health advisers urged consumers to continue to exercise caution about eating too many products high in saturated fat and to stick to low-fat versions instead.

Dairy products form an important part of a healthy balanced diet; however, many are high in saturated fat and salt. Were all consuming too much of both, increasing our risk of heart disease, said a spokesman for Public Health England. We recommend choosing lower-fat varieties of milk and dairy products or eating smaller amounts to reduce saturated fat and salt in the diet.

Givens and colleagues from Reading, Copenhagen University in Denmark and Wageningen University in the Netherlands analysed 29 studies involving 938,465 participants from around the world undertaken over the last 35 years, including five done in the UK.

No associations were found for total (high-fat/low-fat) dairy and milk with the health outcomes of mortality, CHD or CVD, they said. In fact, they added, fermented dairy products may potentially slightly lower the risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

Doctors, public health experts and official healthy eating guidelines have for many years identified saturated fats as potentially harmful for heart and cardiovascular health and advised consumers to minimise their intake.

That has led to consumers increasingly buying lower-fat versions of dairy products. For example, 85% of all milk sold in the UK is now semi-skimmed or skimmed.

Givens said consumers were shunning full-fat versions of cheese, milk or yoghurt in the mistaken view that they could harm their health. Young people, especially young women, were now often drinking too little milk as a result of that concern, which could damage the development of their bones and lead to conditions in later life including osteoporosis, or brittle bones, he said. Consuming too little milk can deprive young people of calcium.

Pregnant women who drank too little milk could be increasing the risk of their child having neuro-developmental difficulties, which could affect their cognitive abilities and stunt their growth, Givens added.

The most recent National Diet and Nutrition Survey, the governments occasional snapshot of eating habits, found that dairy products, including butter, accounted for the highest proportion of saturated fat consumption in British diets 27%, compared with meats 24%. But if butter was not counted then dairy products together were the second largest source of saturated fat, at 22%.

Saturated fat is a vital part of diet. The NDNS found that adults typically got 34.6% of their total energy from fats as a whole, just below the 35% the government recommends. However, while total fat consumption was just within target, saturated fats still made up an unhealthily large proportion of total food energy 12.6%, against the recommended maximum of 11%.

Givens said: Our meta-analysis included an unusually large number of participants. We are confident that our results are robust and accurate.

The research was part-funded by the three pro-dairy groups Global Dairy Platform, Dairy Research Institute and Dairy Australia but they had no influence over it, the paper said. Givens is an adviser to the Food Standards Agency.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/may/08/consuming-dairy-does-not-raise-risk-of-heart-attack-or-stroke-study

Bernie Sanders: Trump was right, Australian healthcare is better

Sanders also says Senate should use Australian system as model while crafting an alternative to Republicans replacement for Obamacare

Bernie Sanders has declared President Donald Trump was right to say Australia has better healthcare than the US.

Sanders, a self-described democratic socialist who ran for the Democratic presidential nomination last year, said the US Senate should use the Australian system as a model while crafting an alternative to the Republican healthcare legislation that Trump endorses.

President Trump is right. The Australian healthcare system provides healthcare to all of its people at a fraction of the cost than we do, Sanders commented on Twitter.

The tweet was accompanied by a short video that set out the virtues of Australias universal healthcare system, saying it guarantees better service to all Australians at about half the cost of US healthcare. The video also notes that Australians can expect to live longer than Americans on average.

Sanderss tweet came two days after Trump told the Australian prime minister, Malcolm Trumbull in New York: You have better healthcare than we do.

The presidents comment raised eyebrows, coming just after the US House of Representatives had approved a Trump-backed bill that would overturn much of former President Barack Obamas signature healthcare law and move the US system further away from universal coverage.

The White House later said Trump was simply being nice to an ally and did not think the United States should adopt Australias healthcare approach.

The healthcare legislation that Trump endorses would pare back insurance protections for the sick and, according to nonpartisan congressional researchers, would lead to 24 million more Americans being without health coverage by 2026.
But the bills approval in the House on Thursday sent the legislation to the Senate, where it has little support.

We will take this pathetic healthcare bill, throw it in the garbage can and do something that will work for ordinary Americans instead, Sanders said in a second tweet on Saturday.

A Vermont independent, Sanders has become more influential in the Senate since 2016, when he took his long-shot presidential bid and turned it into a political movement against inequality.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/may/07/bernie-sanders-trump-was-right-australian-healthcare-is-better

5 Uncommon Health Tests To Ask Your Doctor About

Regular health screenings, such as a colonscopy or blood pressure reading, are key to detecting problems early before they lead to something serious. Yet Americans are surprisingly lax about getting recommended tests. Less than 25 percent of Americans ages 50 to 64 and less than half of those over age 65 are up to date on screenings. But, preventive services, including screenings, can save lives and promote well-being, says Lisa McGuire, Ph.D., an epidemiologist with the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta.   

Aside from the better-known, recommended tests (listed at the bottom of this piece), here are five less-common tests you should talk to your doctor about to see if you should be screened. 

1. C-Reactive Protein (CRP) People over 40 with certain risk factors (slightly elevated cholesterol, a large waistline, a family history of heart disease or being overweight) should get the blood test, which detects the presence of C-reactive proteinsindicators of inflammation in the body. According to the American Heart Association, high levels of C-reactive proteins double the likelihood of suffering cardiac arrest, compared to low levels. A test result greater than 3.0 milligram per liter (mg/L) suggests a higher risk for heart disease and heart attack.

2. Depression A depression screening may be in order if you are feeling unusually sad or hopeless and have lost interest in activities that once gave you pleasure for two weeks in a row. Your doctor can do a simple screeningessentially, having you respond to a series of questionsand refer you for treatment, if needed.  

3. Hepatitis C Test Everyone born between 1945 and 1965 should have a one-time blood test to detect this disease, which disproportionately affects the Baby Boomer generation. According to research, baby boomers are six times more likely to have Hepatitis C. Experts suggests this may be due to be risky behaviors like recreational drug use, which were prevalent in the 60s and 70s, as well as the fact that disposable needles were not available at that time for medical procedures and transfusions. As many as 75 percent of cases go undiagnosed, yet Hepatitis C can lead to liver damage, cirrhosis and cancer. Luckily there are now good treatments that are more effective and have fewer side effects than those of the past.

4. Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) Women over 60 are prone to underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism). Although many doctors regularly test patients levels of the hormone to test the functioning of the thyroid gland, you should ask, particularly if you are symptoms, such as experiencing fatigue, increased sensitivity to cold, constipation, dry skin and unexplained weight gain. People with overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism) experience rapid heart rate, nervousness, tremor and sweating. A result between 0.4 to 4.0 milli-international units per liter (mIU/L). 

5. Vitamin D A surprising number of Americans75 percent of teens and adultsare deficient in the sunshine vitamin, which not only helps keep bones and muscles strong but may help lower your risk for cancer and heart disease and bolster your immune system. Ask your doctor for a 25-hydroxy vitamin D blood test to determine how much vitamin D is in your body. Many experts recommend a level between 20 and 40 nanograms per milliliter (ng/ml). Others recommend a level between 30 and 50 ng/ml.

You should also be getting these standard recommended tests

Blood Pressure Get a blood pressure screening at least once every two years to detect hypertension, which could be a warning sign of coronary disease and other problems. A normal blood pressure reading is a systolic blood pressure of less than 120 and a diastolic blood pressure of less than 80. 

Cholesterol Men 35 and up and women 45 and up with heart disease risk factors, should have their cholesterol levels tested every five years. Doctors take a blood sample to assess levels of your total cholesterol and its components. Desirable levels of each:

  • Total cholesterol of less than 200 mg/dl. 
  • HDL (the good high-density lipoprotein) greater than or equal to 60 mg/dl.
  • Triglycerides less than 150 mg/dl 

Colonoscopy To catch colon or rectal cancer early, you need a flexible sigmoidoscopy every five years or a colonoscopy every 10 years from ages 50 to 75. Ask your doctor which test is right for you.

Mammogram (Women) Although theres some debate about when to start mammograms, women over 50 should have them regularly. The American Cancer Society recommends that Women age 45 to 54 get mammograms every year. Women 55 and older can switch to mammograms every 2 years, or can continue yearly screening. Screening should continue as long as a woman is in good health and expected to live 10 or more years.

Pap Test (Women) You should get a Pap smear every three years to test for cervial cancer. If you get a Pap smear coupled with an HPV test, which detects the strains of the virus strongly linked to cervical cancer, however, you can delay screening to every five years. After 65, you no longer need the test if results in the ten years prior were normal, according to the American Cancer Society.

Bone Density Scan (Women) Women should get a bone density test using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), an advanced x-ray technology, at age 65 to look for signs of the bone-thinning disease osteoporosis.  The test results in a T score, which indicates the amount of bone you have compared to a young woman with peak bone mass, and is used to estimate your risk of a fracture. A score above -1 is considered normal; a score between -1 and -2.5 is classified as osteopenia (low bone mass), and a score below -2.5 is considered osteoporosis. 

Prostate Exam (Men) Starting at age 50, men should talk to their health care provider about the pros and cons of having their blood tested for levels of prostate-specific antigen, or PSA, which may indicate the presence of prostate cancer.  

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Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/11/12/5-uncommon-health-tests-to-ask-your-doctor-about_n_8569740.html

Trump taps anti-abortion leader for top health agency post

(CNN)US President Donald Trump has appointed one of the country’s leading anti-abortion crusaders to a senior communications post in the Department of Health and Human Services.

Conservative author and commentator Charmaine Yoest will serve as assistant secretary of public affairs at HHS, the White House said in a statement Friday.
Yoest, who campaigned actively for Trump, is a senior fellow at American Values, a conservative nonprofit that supports “traditional family values.” But she’s best known as former president of Americans United for Life, which promotes anti-abortion legislation at the state and federal level.
    Under Yoest’s leadership from 2008 to 2016 the group helped states adopt numerous abortion restrictions, including a ban after 20 weeks of pregnancy.
    She has been known to cite medically dubious claims, including that abortion increases a woman’s risk of breast cancer. (Yoest herself is a breast cancer survivor).
    In a 2012 interview, she told a New York Times reporter that the scientific establishment “is under the control of the abortion lobby.”
    The assistant secretary of public affairs shapes the agency’s communications strategy. Yoest replaces Kevin Griffis, who joined Planned Parenthood earlier this month as vice president of communications.
    Observers on both sides of the political aisle saw the appointment as a clear win for the anti-abortion movement.
    Speaker Paul Ryan said the appointment demonstrated “yet again” the administration’s “commitment to the pro-life cause.”
    Anti-abortion leader Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the Susan B. Anthony List, praised Yoest as “one of the pro-life movement’s most articulate and powerful communicators.”
    Abortion supporters criticized the appointment as dangerous.
    “It is unacceptable that someone with a history of promoting myths and false information about women’s health is appointed to a government position whose main responsibility is to provide the public with accurate and factual information,” Dawn Laguens, executive vice president of Planned Parenthood, said in a statement.
    “Ms. Yoest has a long record of seeking to undermine women’s access to health care and safe, legal abortion by distorting the facts, and her selection shows yet again that this administration is pandering to extreme conservatives and ignoring the millions of men and women nationwide who support women’s constitutionally protected health care rights and don’t want to go backward,” Democratic Sen. Patty Murray said in a statement.

    Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/04/30/health/charmaine-yoest-hhs/index.html

    What Im really thinking: the dental hygienist

    The worst thing is the disrespect some people show by not cleaning their teeth or by eating just before seeing me

    You may think youre coming in just for a clean but its my job to check your oral cavity for lesions, your teeth for caries and your gums for periodontal disease, and to provide advice to get you to full oral health. Many a joke is made about relaxing in the chair. I call it the comfy chair; it breaks the tension. I know its not the most pleasant experience, so I try to alleviate the worry by explaining the emotions people feel as they lie back. After all, I am exposing your vulnerable, soft places your belly and chest and instinct prompts the nervous patient to cross their arms. Then, as I start the treatment, I am right there in your personal space, wearing a mask and glasses another uncomfortable feeling for you.

    I like my job and people mostly leave feeling better, wiser and yes cleaner. I dont mind how bad your teeth are, its bloody satisfying getting a load of tartar off, leaving smooth enamel to rub your tongue around instead of rough rock. But I have feelings too; I cant help looking at your blackheads and up your nose at your nasal hair (or worse). You cant blame me: I have excellent lighting.

    I find it rather creepy when your tongue follows my instruments and irritating when it nudges them out of the way, and when you look me in the eye as I move into your vision. And why, all of a sudden, cant you swallow your own saliva? But the worst thing is the disrespect some people show by not cleaning their teeth or by eating just before seeing me. Id never say it, but I so want to ask: Would you leave another bodily cavity in the same condition if you were visiting your gynaecologist for a smear test or a urologist for a prostate exam? I dont think so.

    Tell us what youre really thinking email mind@theguardian.com

    Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/sep/17/what-really-thinking-dental-hygienist

    Plain cigarette packaging could drive 300,000 Britons to quit smoking

    Review by research organisation Cochrane suggests impact of UKs ban on branded packs could echo results seen in Australia

    Plain cigarette cartons featuring large, graphic health warnings could persuade 300,000 people in the UK to quit smoking if the measure has the effect it had in Australia, scientists say.

    Standardised cigarette packaging will be compulsory in the UK from 20 May. A new review from the independent health research organisation Cochrane on the impact of plain packaging around the world has found that it does affect the behaviour of smokers.

    In the UK, the tobacco industry has become increasingly innovative in the design of cigarette packets as other controls on sales and advertising have taken hold, according to Ann McNeill, professor of tobacco addiction at Kings College London. The tobacco industry has been focusing its efforts on the tobacco packs, she said.

    Among those that will be banned are vibrant pink packets, targeted at young women, and gimmicky cartons that slide rather than flip open. The rules that come into force next month require all packs to look alike, with graphic health warnings across 65% of their surface.

    The Cochrane reviewers found 51 studies that looked at standardised packaging and its impact on smokers, but only one country had implemented the rule fully at the time. Australia brought in plain packs in 2012.

    Analysing the evidence from Australia, the team found a reduction in smoking of 0.5% up to one year after the policy was introduced. According to the Australian government, that translates to 100,000 people no longer smoking. The decline was attributable specifically to plain packaging, after taking into account the continuing drop in the numbers of smokers caused by other tobacco control measures.

    Dr Jamie Hartmann-Boyce of the Cochrane tobacco addiction group at Oxford Universitys Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences said: We are not able to say for sure what the impact would be in the UK, but if the same magnitude of decrease was seen in the UK as was observed in Australia, this would translate to roughly 300,000 fewer smokers following the implementation of standardised packaging.

    The review found signs that more people were trying to quit smoking as a result of plain cartons, rising from 20.2% before to 26.6% after introduction. There was also evidence that standardised packs were less attractive to those who did not smoke, making it less likely that they would start.

    However, the researchers say variations in the way countries are introducing standardised packs may affect the outcomes. Some allow different colours, slightly different carton shapes and the use of descriptive words such as gold or smooth.

    Cancer Research UK backs plain packaging. Smoking kills 100,000 people in the UK every year, so we support any effective measure which can help reduce this devastating impact. The evidence shows that standardised packaging works and helps to reduce smoking rates, said George Butterworth, the charitys tobacco policy manager.

    Its too soon to see the impact in the UK, as the new legislation will only be fully implemented in May, but we hope to see similar positive results as the UK strives towards a day when no child smokes tobacco. Cancer Research UK is continuing to evaluate the impact of standardised packaging in the UK and will share the lessons with other countries who are considering introducing them.

    Simon Clark, director of the smokers group Forest, said the idea that plain packaging would have an impact on the number of smokers in the UK was based on hope and anecdotal evidence.

    Since plain packaging was introduced in Australia, smoking rates have fallen, but only in line with historical trends, he said. Its grasping at straws to credit plain packaging with the continued reduction in smoking rates, because the most significant anti-smoking measure in recent years in Australia has been a massive increase in tobacco taxation. Like graphic health warnings, the novelty of plain packaging quickly wears off.

    Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/apr/27/plain-cigarette-packaging-could-drive-300000-britons-to-quit-smoking

    Elton John cancels Las Vegas shows due to ‘potentially deadly’ infection

    The singer announced he was pulling out of several shows after contracting a bacterial infection in South America that led to two nights in intensive care

    Sir Elton John has pulled out of a series of concerts in Las Vegas due to an unusual bacterial infection he contracted in South America, which left him in intensive care.

    The singer announced he was pulling out of the shows on Monday in a statement that explained that he spent two nights in intensive care and was released on 22 April after becoming ill on a flight to the UK from Chile.

    During a recent, successful tour of South America, Elton contracted a harmful and unusual bacterial infection, the statement read.

    During his return flight home from Santiago, Chile he became violently ill. Upon returning to the UK, Eltons doctors admitted him to hospital, where he underwent immediate treatment to remove the infection. After spending two nights in intensive care followed by an extended stay in hospital, Elton was released from hospital.

    It added that the infection was rare and potentially deadly but that the stars medical team identified it quickly and that he is expected to make a full and complete recovery.

    Elton John also added: I am so fortunate to have the most incredible and loyal fans and apologise for disappointing them. I am extremely grateful to the medical team for their excellence in looking after me so well.

    The affected shows were part of the Million Dollar Piano show and were due to take place at Caesars Palace in April and May, while another gig in Bakersfield, California, on 6 May was also cancelled.

    The singer is expected to return for his scheduled gigs at Twickenham, in London on 3 June.

    Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/music/2017/apr/24/elton-john-cancels-concerts-las-vegas-bacteria-infection

    Japanese Male Anti-Aging Guru


    This Ancient Chinese Secret Gives William His

    First Rock-Hard Erection Since 2010…

    sex crisis

    Click Here To Learn More

     

     

    One of the Japanese anti-aging gurus is this dr. When he was in 30's, he looked 50's, but now he is in 50's and looks 30's. What's his secret? Basically,one meal per day. He drinks some tea and small sweets during day and eat only dinner at night. When you are hungry and your stomach sounds,that's a sign that growth hormone start increasing. So, don't eat jsut because it's lunch time or you are hungry, wait to hear the stomach sound.
    When your stomach starts screaming, growth hormon is coming out.

    He goes to bed 10pm and wakes up 3am, because grown hormon increases from 10pm to 2am.

    Another secret of his beautiful skin is that he uses umbrella to protect from UV rays. It's becomming trend even for men to use umbrella in Japan. really? maybe yes.

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